A-Z index of CMI

You can search the A-Z Index for Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) by the medicine's Brand Name.

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Brand Name: the name given to the medicine by the company that makes the medicine. There may be more than one brand name if more than one company makes the medicine.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Reading the CMI does not take the place of counselling by a health professional. Always talk to your doctor or pharmacist about all aspects of your medicines, including why you are taking them and what benefits / risks you can expect.
The CMI for your medicine that is on this web site is the most up-to-date version available. It may differ from a CMI that you previously received from your doctor or pharmacist, or in your pack of medicine.

This web site does not contain all CMIs for medicines sold in Australia and not all medicines have a CMI available for them. If you do not find a CMI for your medicine on this page, contact the pharmaceutical company who makes the medicine or talk to your doctor or pharmacist. The information on this web site is intended for use in Australia only.

Product name Date released
Expand Antroquoril 14 Apr 2021
 
Antroquoril contains the active ingredient called betamethasone valerate.
It is a type of cortisone and belongs to the group of medicines called corticosteroids. Antroquoril is classified as a moderately strong topical corticosteroid.
Antroquoril is used on the skin to relieve the redness, swelling, itching and discomfort of many skin problems such as:
Psoriasis (a stubborn skin disorder with raised, rough reddened areas covered with dry, fine silvery scales)
Eczema (an often itchy skin condition with redness, swelling, oozing of fluid, crusting which may lead to scaling)
other types of dermatitis
Your doctor may have prescribed Antroquoril for another reason.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Antroquoril has been prescribed for you.
This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription.
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Expand Apidra 15 Jun 2021
 
Apidra is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus.
Apidra is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas.
Apidra is a short-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a long-acting insulin in combination with Apidra.
Apidra is not addictive.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Apidra has been prescribed for you.
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Expand Apomine Intermittent 01 Apr 2021
 
APOMINE Intermittent contains apomorphine, which belongs to a group of medicines called dopaminergic compounds.
Apomorphine is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease to reduce the number and severity of bouts of freezing and stiffness (or "off" periods).
This medicine works by acting on dopamine receptors. These receptors help control movement by the body.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you.
Your doctor may have prescribed it for another reason.
This medicine is not addictive.
This medicine is available only with a doctor's prescription.
There is not enough information to recommend the use of this medicine in children under 18 years.
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Expand Apresoline 10 Apr 2017
 
Apresoline is an injection that is used when your blood pressure is very high and needs to be brought down quickly. Apresoline is used to reduce very high blood pressure especially during late pregnancy.
Apresoline belongs to a group of medicines called vasodilators. It acts by relaxing and widening (dilating) the walls of blood vessels. This action helps to reduce blood pressure and increase blood and oxygen supply to the heart, brain, spleen and kidneys.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why this medicine has been prescribed for you.
Your doctor may have prescribed it for another purpose.
Apresoline is only available with a doctor's prescription. It is not addictive.
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Expand Aptivus 04 Nov 2016
 
Aptivus is used in the treatment of the infection caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1). HIV-1 is the main virus responsible for the development of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).
Aptivus contains the active ingredient Tipranavir. Tipranavir belongs to a group of antiretroviral medicines called protease inhibitors.
Tipranavir helps control HIV infection by inhibiting or interfering with the protease enzyme that the HIV virus needs to multiply.
Aptivus does not cure or prevent HIV-1 infection or AIDS, but it does hinder the growth of HIV-1.
Aptivus is prescribed for use in combination with low-dose ritonavir and other antiretrovirals.
When these medicines are taken with Aptivus, the growth of HIV-1 is hindered more effectively.
Aptivus has not been shown to reduce the incidence or frequency of the illnesses caused by AIDS. It is important for you to continue seeing your doctor regularly.
Aptivus does not reduce the risk of or prevent transmission of HIV-1 to others through sexual contact or blood contamination.
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Expand Arabloc 29 Apr 2020
 
Arabloc is a type of medicine used to treat rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis. Arabloc helps to slow down the process of joint damage and to relieve the symptoms of the disease, such as joint tenderness and swelling, pain and morning stiffness.
Arabloc works by selectively interfering with the ability of white blood cells called lymphocytes to produce the disease response that ultimately leads to pain, inflammation and joint damage.
Your doctor, however, may have prescribed Arabloc for another purpose.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why it has been prescribed for you.
This medicine is only available with a doctor's prescription.
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Expand Aranesp for anaemia of renal failure 02 Jul 2019
 
Aranesp is used to treat anaemia that comes about because of chronic renal failure (kidney failure). Anaemia is when your blood does not contain enough red blood cells.
In kidney failure, the kidney does not produce enough of the natural hormone erythropoietin. Erythropoietin encourages your bone marrow to produce more red blood cells. Kidney failure can often cause anaemia, which may require you to have blood transfusions.
Aranesp is a recombinant erythropoietic protein produced by special mammalian cells. Your doctor has given you Aranesp to treat your anaemia. It will reduce your need for blood transfusions. Aranesp will help your bone marrow to produce more red blood cells, like your natural erythropoietin. The active ingredient of Aranesp is darbepoetin alfa that works in exactly the same way as the natural hormone erythropoietin.
It will take your body a short time to make red blood cells, so it will be about 4 weeks before you notice any effect. If you are on dialysis, your normal dialysis routine will not affect the ability of Aranesp to treat your anaemia.
Your doctor may have prescribed Aranesp for another reason. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Aranesp has been prescribed for you.
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Expand Aranesp for chemotherapy induced anaemia 27 Apr 2020
 
Aranesp is used to treat anaemia in cancer patients who are receiving chemotherapy. Anaemia is when your blood does not contain enough red blood cells.
Anaemia can occur as a result of chemotherapy medicines used to treat cancer. Some chemotherapy medicines can affect the bone marrow's ability to make red blood cells. When your red blood cell count falls too low, you become anaemic. Some affects of anaemia can include tiredness, dizziness, increased heart beat, depression, anorexia, nausea, feeling cold and pale skin colour.
Aranesp is a recombinant erythropoietic protein produced by special mammalian cells. Your doctor has given you Aranesp to treat the anaemia caused by the chemotherapy medicines used to treat your cancer and where blood transfusion is not considered appropriate. Aranesp will help your bone marrow to produce more red blood cells, like your natural erythropoietin. The active ingredient of Aranesp is darbepoetin alfa that works in exactly the same way as the natural hormone erythropoietin.
It will take your body a short time to make red blood cells, so it will be about 4 weeks before you notice any effect.
Anaemia can occur as a result of cancer. Aranesp should not be used to treat anaemia that results from cancer.
Your doctor may have prescribed Aranesp for another reason. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Aranesp has been prescribed for you.
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Expand Aratac 18 Oct 2019
 
Aratac is used to control a fast or irregular heart beat.
Aratac belongs to a group of medicines called antiarrhythmics. It works by lengthening the gap between one heartbeat and the next, helping to bring the heart rate to a slower and more regular pace.
Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about why Aratac has been prescribed for you.
Your doctor may have prescribed Aratac for another reason.
Aratac is not recommended for use in children, as its safety and effectiveness in children has not been established.
Aratac is available only with a doctor's prescription.
There is no evidence that Aratac is addictive.
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Expand Arava 17 May 2021
 
Do not use if you have ever had an allergic reaction to leflunomide, teriflunomide or any of the ingredients listed at the end of the CMI. Do not use if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, are not using reliable birth control, or are breastfeeding.
There are a number of other circumstances in which a person must not use this medicine. Check if these apply to you before taking Arava (see the full CMI for more details).
Talk to your doctor if you have any other medical conditions or take any other medicines. For more information, see Section 2. What should I know before I use Arava? in the full CMI.
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